Gibson.com: Hilarious misheard lyrics

This week my feature for Gibson.com is about misheard song lyrics. There were a lot that I would like to have included except one has to tone down ones’ language while writing for Gibson.com. But I can include them here:

“My anus will fix it, you’re addicted to love” instead of “Might as well face it, you’re addicted to love” in Robert Palmer’s “Addicted to Love”

“I got my first real sex dream…” instead of “I got my first real six-string” in Bryan Adams’ “Summer of 69”

And my favourite, courtesy of my nanna, who was riotously offended by it:

“When you go and get stuffed” instead of “When the going gets tough” by Billy Ocean.

Plus some provided by I Heart Guitar readers on Facebook and Twitter:

Red Hot Chilli Peppers, “Californication”

“Dream of Cali for vacation” instead of “Dream of Californication”

Europe, “The Final Countdown”

“There’s a fire downtown” instead of “It’s the final countdown”

The Vines, “Get Free”

“I want a grapefruit! I want a grapefruit! I want a grapefruit!” instead of “I wanna get free! I wanna get free! I wanna get free!”

Megadeth, “Angry Again”

“Steve Vai dissipates” instead of “Steam finally dissipates.”

Vanilla Ice, “Ice Ice Baby”

Alright, let’s get outta here, where I take your mother” instead of “Alright, let’s get outta here. Word to your mother.”

Cold Chisel, “Cheap Wine”

“Cheap wine and a female goat” instead of “Cheap wine and a three-day growth.”

Cyndi Lauper, “Time After Time”

“Child Of The Sun” instead of “Time After Time.”

Grease, “You’re The One That I Want”

“I’ve got shoes, they’re made of plywood” instead of “I’ve got chills, they’re multiplying.”

The Smiths, “Some Girls Are Bigger Than Others”

“Send me the pillow, the one that you drool on” instead of “Send me the pillow, the one that you dream on.”

Finally, a misheard artist name, rather than a misheard lyric: “Penis Of Terror” instead of “Peter Cetera.”

Kiss This Guy? The Top Ten Most Hilarious Misheard Lyrics in Rock

Ever since listeners were able to listen to songs, listeners were able to mishear them. Back in 1964, the FBI began a two-year investigation into the song “Louie Louie” to determine whether the lyrics were obscene. (The investigation concluded that the lyrics were “unintelligible at any speed,” and therefore could not with any certainty be declared obscene.) The semi-official term for a misheard song lyric is a ‘mondegreen.’ The name comes from a mis-hearing of the 17th century ballad “The Bonny Earl O’Moray,” as explained by writer Sylvia Wright in a 1954 essay called “The Death Of Lady Mondegreen” in Harper’s Magazine.

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