YES! Jackson Soloist SLX

I was just cruising the Jackson Guitars website and saw this:

Isn’t that something? That’s the Jackson Soloist SLX, and that colour is called Kawasabi Green. I think I’m in love.

It has a basswood body, through-body maple neck (!), Duncan Designed alnico HB102N (neck) and high-output ceramic HB102B (bridge) humbuckers, a bound compound-radius rosewood fretboard, a Floyd Rose Special double-locking two-point tremolo, 24 jumbo frets and three-way pickup switching. It’s also available in Black, Natural and Snow White, but how could you possibly go past Kawasabi Green? You can’t. You just can’t.

[geo-out country=”Australia” note=””]CLICK HERE to buy the Jackson SLX Soloist X Series Electric Guitar Kawasabi Green from Musician’s Friend.[/geo-out]

INTERVIEW: Glenn Hughes

BCC press shot by Marty Temme

Everyone knows Deep Purple’s ‘Mark III’ era with David Coverdale on vocals, Glenn Hughes on bass and vocals, Jon Lord on keys, Ian Paice on drums and Richie Blackmore on guitar. Burn is one of the undisputed classic albums of 70s rock, after all! But not enough attention is paid to the Mark IV era, when Blackmore left and Tommy Bolin stepped in on guitar. This line-up made only one album, 1975’s Come Taste The Band, before going their separate ways. Phoenix Rising is a DVD and CD which looks at this rarely-examined era, including Gettin’ Tighter, an 80-minute documentary featuring in-depth interviews with Lord and Hughes, behind-the-scenes footage from a chaotic Indonesian tour, and even the band’s appearance at the Sunbury music festival here in Melbourne. But the set’s centrepiece is Rises Over Japan, a five-song set featuring “Burn,” “Love Child,” “Smoke On The Water,” “You Keep On Moving” and “Highway Star.” It’s an incredible document of a little-seen era of the band.

The Phoenix Rising DVD is a really cool thing to have, especially the footage of the Mark IV line-up on stage in Japan. 

Oh it is, Peter. That footage is warts and all. You can see in the interview that I’m kind of rattled a little bit. Jon Lord and I did separate interviews but when you look at the footage that was found by Drew Thompson of the Indonesian debacle and the very inebriated performance we did in Tokyo, and then you get Jon Lord into a room one day, and then you get Glenn Hughes – and we had no preconceived notions of what Jon would be talking about – but we were both talking about the same stuff, both pretty much with the same topic.

One thing I find really interesting about that era is that all of you guys were learning for the first time how to be rock stars. The really big concerts like California Jam didn’t exist before then. 

No! And remember in that period, let’s just say the golden era of rock and roll… mate, I’m not being an old fuddy duddy here, I’m talking about the big-time era, the grandiosity of private jets and private this and that, penthouse suites, groupies and all of that. In the era between 1968 and 1975, the Stones and the Beatles and Led Zeppelin and The Who, it was a grand, grand scale. You’re talking to somebody that’s lived through many deaths, many gunshots, many escapades, and I’m here to tell the bloody tale!

I’m glad you are! Now, Tommy Bolin – what was it like to work with him?

Here’s the deal, Peter, with Tommy. When he got into the band, before he played a note with the band I said this to him, because he had the green and yellow and red hair. I said “I don’t care if you get the gig or not, you’re coming home with me.” Because he looked so cool. And also, unbeknownst to me, I wanted to have a relationship in the band with somebody I could drink with and get high with. Tommy was that guy. We were both born in the same month of the same year, both Leos, both with the same kind of composure and nature. Two very working-class boys. We hit it off, and he lived at my home for three months when he joined the band. In fact the night he got the gig he just moved right on in! When we lost Tommy 18 months later it was really beyond sad for me. To bury a 25-year-old friend from this hopeless addiction…

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COOL GEAR ALERT: Washburn Nuno Bettencourt N7VINTAGE

I’m so glad this axe exists. The Washburn Nuno Bettencourt signature model deserves a seven-string variant. This guitar just makes so much sense: killer Stephens Extended Cutaway neck joint for those high notes, big reverse headstock for extra resonance and sustain on the low notes, Original Floyd Rose bridge, aged alder body, Buzz Feiten tuning system, and of course that finish (or lack thereof) which really allows the wood to breathe and the high end to sing out. It kills me that I can’t afford this axe right now, because I can already tell that it would make my life infinitely better in every conceivable way.

By the way, dig the fretwork on the pics below.

PRESS RELEASE

Nuno Bettencourt’s Signature with a Seventh String Twist

Upon one look at the Nuno Bettencourt Signature Series N7VINTAGE guitar, it is clear that the ingenuity and attention to detail that is synonymous with the Washburn name is still top notch. Offering the same sleek style that lovers of the guitar legend have become accustomed to, and increasing the versatility with the seventh string, this instrument enables players to harness Nuno’s unique tone.

Offering a slim, aged alder body with a Stephens® extended cutaway neck joint, this beauty plays like a breeze. In addition to its supreme comfort, the sound of this axe is a perfect replication of Bettencourt’s signature sound thanks to the Seymour Duncan® Distortion pickup in the bridge position and the Seymour Duncan® ’59 neck pickup. The extremely fast neck offers a 22 fret ebony fingerboard with a maple neck and the standard stunning reverse headstock. With the Buzz Feiten tuning system paired up with Original Floyd Rose® tremolo, this guitar can take the most vigorous of playing and remain perfectly in tune.

As with the N4VINTAGE in the same series, all hardware and parts on this guitar are aged to give the look of a guitar that has been owned for years. The N7VINTAGE can give players the freedom they need to explore, along with the added ability to sound tight and feel right while playing. [geo-out country=”Australia” note=””]The N7VINTAGE retails at $3529.90.[/geo-out]

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Caparison is back, baby!

 

 

New website coming soon! Just saw the following on Bmusic:

Please be informed that Caparison Guitars finished all activity in May, 2011 due to the bankruptcy of Kyowa Shokai Co., Ltd. who was then owner of the Caparison brand.

On behalf of Kyowa, I, Itaru Kanno would like to express my most sincere apologies to all of our customers and artists who had difficulties as a result.

From this unhappy event, the guitar manufacturer, the companies concerned and I (designer) have been striving for a fresh start for Caparison Guitars.

At this time, we are pleased to announce the takeover of Caparison by the Caparison Guitar Company Ltd. Caparison Guitars is reborn and makes a fresh start with immediate effect.

Oct. 12, 2011
Itaru Kanno, Caparison Guitar Co., Ltd.