Jaden Rose Guitars at NAMM 2012

Just stumbled across this video on YouTube of the fine folks from England’s Jaden Rose Guitars capering at the NAMM Show (including some great shreddage by Tosin Abasi of Animals As Leaders). These guys make incredible guitars that are especially shred and djent-friendly. Six-strings, seven-strings, eight-strings, fixed bridge, Floyd Rose, extended scale, multi-scale, exotic woods, DiMarzio pickups, ridiculously comfortable necks…   want!

 

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Stone Sour hit the studio

Great to hear that Stone Sour have returned to the studio to record the follow-up to Audio Secrecy. I gave that album the ‘drag it out after about a year and see if it still holds up’ test last week, in fact, and found myself drawn to it pretty strongly (read my interview with guitarist Jim Root about it here). So I can’t wait to hear what they come up with next.

Here’s the press release.

STONE SOUR ENTER THE STUDIO TO RECORD FOURTH ALBUM

BAND RECORDING WITH PRODUCER DAVID BOTTRILL IN IOWA, USA

ALBUM TO BE RELEASED LATE 2012

Stone Sour, the Gold-certified, Grammy-nominated rock band, are proud to announce that they will begin recording their fourth album in March for longtime label Roadrunner Records. With most of thenew album already written, the band will soon head into Sound Farm Studios just outside of their native Des Moines, Iowa with producer David Bottrill (Tool, Muse, Staind). The album is expected in the Australian spring of 2012, two years after the band’s most recent long player Audio Secrecy, which debuted at No. 6 on the Billboard chart, No. 1 on the U.S. iTunes Rock Album chart, and scored the highest international debuts of the band’s career including Top 5 charts in Germany, Japan and Austria, and Top 10 in the U.K. and Australia.

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A Strat Is Born

Check out this great video by Fender about the birth of a Fender Stratocaster. I was lucky enough to take the factory tour myself earlier this year, and I was surprised to see just how much handwork is still put into the guitars. You’ll see examples of that here: even though computer-controlled gadgetry is used in some steps, there’s still a huge amount of human involvement in the birth of a Fender guitar. Fine sanding, installing inlays, building bridges, installing truss rods, hammering in frets, shielding the electronics cavities, winding pickups… its’ just cool to see that there’s such a human element in every Fender.

It’s fun to compare it with the one below from 1959 and see how many things are different and how many are the same.