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NAMM: Fender American Vintage Series Basses

Fender American Vintage 74 Jazz Bass2
As a proud Fender American Vintage series owner myself, I always love checking out what the company does with the line. The recent revamp introduced some very cool guitars (including the new ’65 Strat reissue), and now there are some new basses added to the collection. The press release is below. Which one do you like best? My favourite is the ’74 Jazz Bass.
FENDER® RELEASES NEW AMERICAN VINTAGE SERIES BASSES

SCOTTSDALE, Ariz.  (January 15, 2013) — Fender is proud to announce four bass additions to its acclaimed American Vintage series, all meticulously reimagined to evoke the authentic feel and sound of the original basses released between the late 1950s and early 1970s.

Fender American Vintage 58 Precision Bass
Available in 3-Color Sunburst, White Blonde, and Black, the American Vintage ’58 Precision Bass®commemorates the first year in which the bass that started it all appeared in a 3-Color Sunburst finish. That classic combination is now a longtime Fender tradition, and the ’58 American Vintage Precision Bass brings you other authentic features, including a lightweight alder body (Ash on White Blonde model), thick “C”-shaped maple neck with 20 vintage-style frets and black dot inlays, gold anodized aluminum pickguard with lacquer finish, and new American Vintage ’58 split single-coil pickup. Also includes lower-mounted finger rest, vintage-style bridge with threaded steel “barrel” saddles, flat-top knurled chrome control knobs, reverse tuners, mounted chrome pickup and bridge covers, and more.

Fender American Vintage 63 Precision Bass

The year 1963 marks an important moment in Precision Bass history because that’s when a comfortable new round-laminated rosewood fingerboard first appeared on the bass that revolutionized the world of music. That’s here on the new American Vintage ’63 Precision Bass, which evokes that year’s model with other authentic features, including a slightly wider “C”-shaped maple neck, clay-colored dot position inlays, three-ply mint green pickguard (four-ply tortoiseshell pickguard on 3-Color Sunburst model), new American Vintage ’63 split single-coil pickup, lower-mounted finger rest, vintage-style bridge with threaded steel “barrel” saddles, flat-top knurled chrome control knobs, reverse tuners, chrome pickup and bridge covers, auxiliary strap button on the back of the headstock, and more. Available in 3-Color Sunburst, Olympic White, Faded Sonic Blue, and Frost Red.

Fender American Vintage 64 Jazz Bass

The Jazz Bass acquired an even slimmer “C”-shaped maple neck in 1964. That’s what you’ll find here on theAmerican vintage ’64 Jazz Bass®, which has other authentic features including a round-laminated rosewood fingerboard with 20 vintage-style frets and clay-colored dot inlays, three-ply white pickguard (four-ply tortoiseshell pickguard on 3-Color Sunburst and Olympic White models), new American Vintage ’64 Jazz Bass single-coil pickups, lower-mounted finger rest, vintage-style bridge with threaded steel “barrel” saddles, black plastic control knobs, reverse tuners, chrome pickup and “F”-stamped bridge covers with vintage-accurate positioning, auxiliary strap button on the back of the headstock, and more. Available in 3-Color Sunburst, Olympic White, Lake Placid Blue (with matching headstock), and Black.

Significant changes were afoot in 1974 for the Jazz Bass. The bridge pickup had been moved about half an inch closer to the bridge only the year before, and 1974 saw the last of the four-bolt necks for quite a while. Further, the slim “C”-shaped maple neck was re-sculpted with a meatier U-shaped profile (and acquired a walnut “skunk” stripe, white fingerboard binding and pearl block inlays made their first appearance, andblack pickguards replaced their longstanding tortoiseshell predecessors.

Fender American Vintage 74 Jazz Bass

The American Vintage ’74 Jazz Bass encompasses all of the above and is the sole member of the new American Vintage bass lineup to offer a choice of maple and round-laminated rosewood fingerboards, each with white binding, pearl block inlays and 20 vintage-style frets. Other authentic features include a urethane-finished alder body (ash on Natural-finish model), three-ply black/white/black pickguard (three-play white/black/white on Black model). New American Vintage ’74 Jazz Bass single-coil pickups, upper-mounted thumb rest, vintage-style bridge with single-groove steel “barrel” saddles, ‘70s-style “Fender”-stamped open-gear tuners, four-bolt “F”-stamped neck plate, chrome pickup and “F”-stamped bridge covers with vintage-accurate positioning, and more. Available in 3-Color Sunburst, Olympic White, Black, and Natural.

For more information and to find a dealer near you, visit www.fender.com.

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About Fender Musical Instruments Corporation
Fender Musical Instruments Corporation (FMIC) is a leading, global musical instruments company whose comprehensive portfolio of brands includes Fender®, Squier®, Guild®, Tacoma®, Gretsch®, Jackson®, Charvel®, EVH®, SWR® and Groove Tubes®, among others. Fender® instruments include the Telecaster®, Stratocaster®, Precision Bass® and Jazz Bass® guitars. For more information, visit www.fender.com.

In 2007, FMIC acquired KMC Music, one of the largest independent U.S. distributors of musical instruments and accessories. In 2011, KMC Music and Musicorp united their sales and catalog divisions as KMCMusicorp, creating a leading wholesaler of musical instruments, accessories and lighting equipment. KMCMusicorp produces and/or distributes Ovation®, Takamine® and Hamer® guitars; Latin Percussion®, Gretsch® Drums, Gibraltar® Hardware, Toca® Percussion, Sabian® cymbals and Genz Benz® amplifiers and more. For more information, visit www.kmcmusicorp.com.


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Peter Hodgson Hi! I'm Peter Hodgson. I write for Gibson.com, Australian Guitar, Australian Musician, Mixdown Magazine (including my instructional column, 'Unleash Your Inner Rock God,' which has been running since 2007), BluntBeat (including their weekly hard rock/metal column Crunch) and The Brag. And I'm Assistant Social Coordinator with Seymour Duncan. I've been playing guitar since I was 8 years old, and I've been writing for magazines since I was 18. I've also worked as a guitar teacher (up to 50 students a week), a setup tech, a newspaper editor, and I've also dabbled in radio a little bit. I live in Melbourne, Australia, and my hobbies include drinking way too much coffee, and eating way too much Mexican food. You can check out my guitar playing at Bandcamp or on YouTube, and feel free to email me at iheartguitarblog@gmail.com

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