The Ultimate Guitar Pickup Guide

Pickup Basics

The simplest way to think of a pickup is “like a microphone for an electric guitar.” And have you ever noticed that if you pluck the string close to the bridge the note will sound bright and twangy, whereas if you pick right down by the neck you’ll hear a softer, rounder tone? Well if you place a pickup near the bridge of the guitar it will sound sharper and brighter compared to one that’s placed near the neck. This is why the majority of guitars have more than one pickup: so you can select different sounds from the full and warm to the thin and snappy.

From a mechanical perspective, a pickup is simply a magnet with a bunch of copper wire wrapped around it. The magnet creates its own magnetic field. The vibration of the metallic guitar string interacts with that field, and the changing magnetic flux induces a voltage in the coil of wire. This then gets sent to your amp where it’s turned into music. There are two main types of pickups: single coils and humbuckers. Let’s have a look at each, and what they do.

Single Coils
Single coils (like you might find on a Fender Telecaster or Stratocaster) have a clear, twangy sound, and they tend to sound really great through a clean, un-distorted amp setting. This type of single coil pickup is made by wrapping wire around six ‘slug’ pole pieces (which are held in place by flatwork to create a bobbin). A cover is usually placed over the pickup to protect the wire.

But single coils have a drawback: you’ll notice a bit of background buzz which is just part and parcel of the single coil experience. Some players swear by this sound because it’s a link back to guitar’s vintage past. Others want to get rid of it so they can only have the pristine single coil sound minus the hum. Various noiseless single coils are available from companies like Fender, DiMarzio, Kinman and Seymour Duncan. Single coils are great for country, blues, indie and alternative styles.

Humbuckers
The idea behind humbuckers is to use two separate pickup coils, each wound in a different direction, over a central magnet. The hum is cancelled out by the two different coil directions, and the overall tone is generally thicker, louder, warmer and fuller than single coils. Humbuckers are great for heavier styles like classic rock, hard rock and metal, and they can add some toughness and raunch to blues too. And the softer, smoother tone of humbuckers makes them great for jazz as well, especially if you use a humbucker in the neck position on a big hollow-body guitar.

You can use single coils and humbuckers in the same guitar. Popular configurations include a humbucker in the bridge position with single coils in the middle and neck spots; humbuckers in the bridge and neck with a single in the middle; or a single coil in the bridge position of a Telecaster with a humbucker in the neck position.

But What Are P90s?
The P90 is a single coil too, but it’s larger than a Stratocaster-style single coil, and its sound is edgier, rattier and hotter. It’s a great choice for alternative, punk, country and blues, goes great with slide guitar, and is even suited to styles like stoner rock and vintage metal: flip to the neck pickup of a P90-loaded guitar and play Black Sabbath’s “Paranoid” to see what I mean. Because they’re single coils, P90s are prone to the same noise issues. And just like other single coils, various companies also make noiseless versions to counteract this.

Active vs Passive Pickups
A passive pickup is the most common kind (to the point where people rarely even use the term ‘passive pickup’ unless they’re comparing it to an active pickup: they simply say ‘pickup’). An active pickup is usually wound much weaker than a passive pickup, but its signal is amplified from within the pickup itself, usually via an internal 9 volt battery. There are several advantages: the output is usually more powerful; there’s often more sustain; and the sound will stay intact even if you use a really long cable (whereas the signal of a passive pickup will degrade more and more the longer your cable is). Active pickups are available in humbucker and single coil versions, and they’re both very quiet. You’ll hear active EMG single coil pickups in the hands of Mr. David Gilmour in the 80s and 90s – Pink Floyd’s P.U.L.S.E live album and DVD is essentially one huge catalog of great active single coil sounds – while companies like EMG and Seymour Duncan make plenty of humbucker models that are great for heavier styes, where the power and clarity of an active pickup come in really handy during high-speed runs and palm-muted chugs. It’s generally very difficult to install active and passive pickups in the same guitar, so usually you’ll find one kind or the other, not both. If you’d like active and passive sounds in the same guitar, check out Fishman’s Fluence series, active pickups which offer several selectable sounds, usually a more active-voiced and a more passive-voiced one. I particularly like the Devin Townsend signature set.

Magnets
Whether you choose single coil or humbucker, active or passive, the size, type and configuration of magnet/s that you use in your pickup all have a big influence on the sound that the pickup produces, as does the type of wire: how thick it is, how it’s insulated, how it’s wound around the bobbins, how many turns of wire. For instance, if you add more turns of wire then the pickup will have a louder perceived output, but will lose treble frequencies. You can counteract this by using a stronger magnet instead of extra turns, or you can raise the height of adjustable pole pieces to get more treble back into your sound. And the closer the pickup is to the string, the louder the pickup will seem to be. Raise it too close to the strings though, and the pickup’s magnetic field will negatively affect the vibration of the string, leading to weird out-of-tune notes and/or a weird ‘wub-wub-wub’ oscillating overtone. And adjustable pole pieces can also help you to refine the magnetic field and its interaction with different strings. Is the B string a little quiet compared to the rest, especially when you’re running a clean tone? Well then, raise its pole piece a little to boost the height of the magnetic field in that section of pickup. Want less bass and output but more treble? Lower the pickup a little and raise the pole pieces. Easy! But let’s backtrack a bit…

All of these factors influence the sound of a pickup, but one of the easiest to quantify is the magnet type. There are a few magnets that are typically used in pickups, and by knowing a little bit about them you can more easily figure out which one might work for the sound you’re going for. We’ll start by looking at Alnico, an iron alloy which includes iron (of course), aluminuim (Al), nickel (Ni) and cobalt (Co), as well as a little bit of copper (Cu). (I guess when they were naming it they decided against Fealnicocu). The three most commonly used Alnico magnets for pickups are Alnico II, Alnico III and Alnico V, although Alnico VIII is also sometimes used. Let’s look a few of the most popular magnets, with a focus on how they apply to humbuckers.

Alnico III
It may be a little counterintuitive, but Alnico III is the weakest of the magnets used in pickups because it has no cobalt. But I guess it’d be confusing to just call it ‘Alni.’ It has the lowest magnetic pull, which means the strings are less influenced by the pickup’s magnetic pull, and this makes it a popular choice for neck pickups. It’s a little more ‘confident’ in its tone compared to Alnico II, although both exhibit a similar ‘softness.’ Many players like to balance an Alnico III neck pickup against an Alnico II in the bridge.

Alnico II
Alnico II is associated with the original PAF humbucker, and it’s still used today in a great number of pickups. The tone is relatively soft and clear, often described as sweet, with a slight rounding off of the more brittle treble frequencies. It can sound very musical and mellifluous with a clean tone, and rather ’singing’ with overdrive. If you’re running a hotter, more distorted tone you may find that Alnico II humbuckers tend to provide excellent note separation for complex chords.

Alnico V
Alnico V pickups usually sound hotter and more ‘edgy’ than their Alnico II and III counterparts. They’re great at more aggressive tones and in situations where you need a little more ‘unity’ in your chords: notes may knit together a little more tightly when you’re chording through heavy distortion with an Alnico V pickup. It’s also a little warmer in the midrange, which makes it great for lead guitar.

Ceramic
Ceramic magnets are also used in some pickups. Their sound is usually characterised as more ‘modern,’ with a tighter low end, more ‘cut’ and higher output compared to Alnico magnets. You can usually bet that a ceramic-loaded guitar will sound pretty powerful, maybe with a little more bold midrange, especially in the upper mids. Some early ceramic pickups sounded rather flat and pinched, but as pickup companies further explored the capabilities of the magnets they discovered how to really get the most out of the tone.

Alnico VIII
Alnico VIII is probably the least common magnet type, but many players consider it to be an undiscovered gem, It gives you the power of a ceramic magnet but with the warmth and harmonics of an Alnico V, and is a great way of preserving some of the woodiness of your guitar tone while still hitting your amp with plenty of output.

What’s a split coil/coil tap?
Many players confuse ‘coil split’ and ‘coil tap,’ using the terms interchangeably, but they’re actually quite different. A coil split involves a humbucker pickup whose wiring lets you essentially switch one coil off, thereby turning it into a single coil. Many players like having the tonal flexibility of having single coil and humbucker tones available in the same guitar. Unless you’re buying an intentionally vintage-styled pickup, most pickups these days come with four conductor wiring as stock. That usually entails four separate wires (a ‘start’ and ‘end’ for each pickup coil), plus a ground wire. You can have your guitar wired so you can turn off one coil via a push-pull switch built into a volume control, or you can use a separate toggle switch, or (depending on the type of switch you’re using) special custom wiring. You will get single coil hum when using single coil mode, but not humbucker mode.

A coil tap is different: it involves a single coil pickup which is made with an extra wire coming off it to give you two different levels of output. The full output and a lower ‘tapped’ output. Again you can use a push-pull knob, a toggle switch or special wiring to engage the tapped mode. The benefit here is that you can have a ‘full-power’ sound for solos and huge riffs, then flip to tapped mode to reduce the output, distortion and volume for quieter moments when you need to drift into the background a bit.

Acoustic Guitar pickups
Amplifying an acoustic guitar can be tricky. Part of what makes an acoustic guitar great – perhaps the most major part, really – is the resonance that occurs within the body itself. But the most popular type of pickup for acoustic guitars is the piezo element, which lives underneath the bridge saddle and translates the vibration of the strings through the bridge into amplifiable sound. But this process gives you a distinctive harsh ‘quack’ tone which you then need to either live with or eliminate. There are plenty of preamps and outboard devices out there which superimpose ‘profiles’ of different acoustic guitars onto your piezo sound, thickening it up and greatly reducing the synthetic effect of the piezo pickup.

There are a few other options though (other than simply micing your acoustic guitar up with a microphone or two, which can be great in the studio but problematic in a live environment). One is a magnetic pickup, much like those used for electric guitars. These still pick up the sound of the strings themselves, rather than the strings as resonated through the body, but the effect is much warmer and less harsh and brittle than a typical unprocessed piezo element. The other option is an internal microphone system, which will give you a much more accurate reading of the actual sound of your guitar. There are some units which combine several of these options – for instance an internal mic for the resonance and a magnetic or piezo pickup for the detail, with the ability to blend between them. Some of these systems come as stock equipment in the guitar when you buy it, while others will need to be installed, either by yourself or a competent technician (depending on complexity of the job: some simply pop in while others need a little bit more work).

Technical Terms

Pole Piece: A metal slug or screw which corresponds to each individual guitar string, focusing the pickup’s magnetic field at the optimal position to do its job.

Coil: The basic structural foundation of a pickup: wire wrapped around pole pieces, either as a self-contained unit (in a single coil) or as part of a slightly more complex assembly which shares a single magnet (humbucker).

Single coil: a pickup style which provides excellent clarity and translation of the sound of the string, but which is susceptible to certain kinds of background hum.

Humbucker: a pickup designed to eliminate the hum of single coils by cancelling it out with an opposite coil. It has more power and a thicker, warmer sound than a single coil.

Trembucker: Seymour Duncan’s term for a pickup whose pole pieces are spaced slightly wider apart for a guitar with a Fender or Floyd Rose-style bridge.

F-Spaced: DiMarzio’s term for a pickup whose pole pieces are spaced slightly wider apart for a guitar with a Fender or Floyd Rose-style bridge.

Coil Split: A type of wiring option which ‘turns off’ one coil of a humbucker to approximate the sound of a single coil. Usually requires a pickup with four conductor wiring.

Coil Tap: A type of wiring available with certain kinds of single coil where a ‘tap’ is run off the wire at a certain point, giving you two selectable power levels.

Dweezil Zappa brings his Hot Rats tour to Australia

 Dweezil Zappa’s ‘Hot Rats Live Tour’ Coming to Australia this April 

As the son of Frank Zappa, it was inevitable from the moment he was born that Dweezil Zappa was going to be a musician and we’re thrilled to say he is bringing his iconic ‘Hot Rats’ tour to Australia this April, in celebration of 50 years since the album’s release. Featuring a performance of the entirety of his father’s 1969 album, as well as more of Frank Zappa choice cuts, the tour will see dates in Sydney, Brisbane, Perth, Adelaide and Melbourne. 

Dweezil has long undertaken a mission to re-acquaint the world with the sights and sounds of his infamous father and the incredibly talented group of musicians revive Frank’s music in a fresh context, whilst keeping true to Zappa Senior’s unique and impeccable sonic heritage. 

The ‘Hot Rats’ album played a pivotal role in establishing Frank Zappa as a composer and guitarist and was also dedicated to the newborn Dweezil upon its release in 1969. The 50-year old classic album will be surrounded by an assortment of other psychedelic, avant-garde odd metered toe-tappers well known to Zappa aficionados as well as being equally exciting for music fans new to his music. 

Talking about the tour, Dweezil said ‘this is the best version of the band I have ever had. The musicians are able to tackle the hardest instrumental passages and cover a limitless range of vocals’.  Get ready for what’s set to be a tour to remember!

On-sale Dates

Presale Thurs November 21st 10am Local

On Sale Mon November 25th 10am Local

Tour Dates

Thursday 9th April 2020 Fortitude Music Hall, Brisbane

Sunday 12th April 2020 Enmore Theatre, Sydney

Monday 13th April 2020 Croxton Bandroom, Melbourne

Wednesday 15th April 2020 The Gov, Adelaide

Friday 17th April 2020 Astor Theatre, Perth

Also performing at Byron Bay Bluesfest 2020 

For more on Dweezil Zappa see Web | Facebook |  Spotify

Twitch and YouTube and stuff

Hey so …I kinda hate being on camera, but it’s time I knuckled down and did this, yeah?

Once upon a time, people bookmarked the blogs they liked, or they followed them in an RSS reader, and a blogger could write an article and count on it reaching their audience. But that’s just not how people consume content any more; they tend to wait for it to drift through their social media feed. And they tend to watch reviews rather than read them now. Which frankly I think is a good thing because it lets you hear the gear being reviewed, even though I think the best approach is ‘in-depth text review plus video demo.’

But my crushing anxiety about appearing on camera has always gotten in the way of me being a YouTube guy. And I think I just need to get over it. So I’ve started streaming stuff on Twitch (which I’m also publishing on my YouTube channel) and I’ll be doing more YouTube reviews.

So if you’ve followed this site for the 10+ years I’ve been doing it, I hope you’ll give me a chance to get used to this whole ‘being on camera’ thing. I’m a shy guy and most of what I have to say comes out of my fingers either into a guitar or into an article. But the changing media landscape is what it is and I gotta change with it, just as I did when I started I Heart Guitar.

So with that in mind, here are a couple of the live videos I’ve broadcast on Twitch the last couple of days. These are just me noodling and jamming for fun, because guitar is fun, dammit! I would really appreciate it if you subscribe to my Twitch or YouTube channels so you can keep up with this stuff. And you never know when I might live-stream a little noodle-session with a piece of gear I’m reviewing for a magazine.

D’Angelico Guitars are now available at Sweetwater

Here’s some cool news for guitarists in the States: D’Angelico Guitars are now available at Sweetwater. In this video, Don Carr and Mitch Gallagher take a look at the brand. Go here to see the range. They have some pretty incredible deals. Here’s one of my favourite D’Angelicos: the Premier DC in Fiesta Red with ‘Staircase’ tailpiece. Love the art deco vibe that is a hallmark of the D’Angelico style.

Meshiaak’s new album Mask Of All Misery is out Friday!

PRESS RELEASE:

Meshiaak – Release Mask Of All Misery

It has been three years since the Australian quartet’s debut album ‘Alliance of Thieves’ dropped, which married dark undertones, heavy grooves and sophistication whilst retaining old-school metal values. Upon its release Metal Hammer applauded its “modern power/thrash metal attack,” Powerplay exclaimed that the album “bludgeons and berates the senses with incredible precision and astounding musicianship” and Classic Rock revelled in the “mix of brooding progressive metal and heavy rock.”

So, it’s no surprise then, that the band are back to continue the story and have a new member and renewed energy. Formed in Melbourne, by 4ARM’s Danny Camilleri and Teramaze’s Dean Wells with bassist Andrew Cameron, they have recruited drummer David Godfrey who replaces Jon Dette, following his departure due to logistical reasons with him being based in the US and the rest of the band in Australia.

‘Mask Of All Misery’ is an album that journey’s through a maze of toxic influences and the masks the exponents wear. “The album deals with a lot of personal reflection and issues as well as attacking or addressing much broader issues concerning perhaps the ignorance of society in regards to what’s going on around us all,” explains Camilleri.

The album walks through a number of tough subject matters and it’s something the band refuse to shy away from. The opening song, the instrumental ‘Miasma’ sets the scene and tone for what you are about to expect. Miasma comes from the ancient Greek word for “pollution” and the miasma theory was a theory that held diseases such as cholera, chlamydia or the Black Death were caused by a noxious form of “bad air” or “miasma.” “It’s a theory that has been around for many years,” elaborates Camilleri. “ It’s about how the air we breathe is being poisoned intentionally, and we are all subjected to it. There is no greater good in regards to any government or authority. Especially when they are responsible for the deployment of systematically spraying chemicals and spreading airborne diseases in the very air we breathe.”

The title track was the first song written for the album and is based on responding to toxic situations or people, identifying their behaviours and the rationalisation in response to their thought process, projections and intentions. Because “they” wear the mask, it doesn’t mean you have to too. ‘Bury The Bodies’ continues to delve into the sense of being trapped with personal demons and solitude in your own thoughts. “It’s the war we feel inside. Some of us chose to engage in that war and better ourselves and find our truth through it and some of us chose to pretend it doesn’t exist,” says the singer.

‘City Of Ghosts,’ ‘Face of Stone’ and ‘In The Final Hour’ run full force through heavy metal riffery with anthemic muscle. ‘Doves’ deals with showing great resilience and strength in the face of hopelessness, whilst they tackle dark subject matter on ‘Adrena.’ The song takes its name from the word “Adrenochrome,”which has been found to occur naturally in human blood. Theories suggest that it is used as a drug for the “elites” and that it is harvested through the experience of terrifying individuals, mostly children to the brink of fear and extracting their blood to give the “elites” an adrenaline high, at the expense of missing or lost children. Adrenochrome, it has been suggested was also used by the CIA during Project MKUltra and during secret Cold War experiments.

The album closes with the 7 minute and 21 second epic ‘Godless,’ another personal song dealing with manipulation and severing the ties between an empath and narcissist to take back control back of your life.

The album barely takes a breath through the ten songs and deals with personal struggles and the inner-strength to pull yourself through as well as burrowing into the dark underbelly for an album of uncompromising heaviness. However, the band have an ability to sprinkle light, adding visions of hope lyrically and strong sense of melody throughout the unrelenting power and musicianship of the four members.

The album was recorded and produced by Dean Wells at his Wells Productions studio in Melbourne with the songwriting partnership of Camilleri Wells. Talking about the recording process Camilleri says “We generally have an idea of how many songs we want for an album, we aren’t the kind of band that writes 20 tracks and picks the best 9 or 10 to go on the album, if something doesn’t grab us early we tend to just throw it in the bin and work on something that does! We demo every track to almost album quality before even looking at officially beginning recording, then we’ll sit on it a bit and let it digest.”

Expanding on how the writing relationship works he explains, “We don’t designate or anything like that, either Dean will come up with something cool or I will, we’ll work on it from that point until it evolves into what we envisioned in our head, though a lot of the time the song will take on a completely different face than when we first began work on it, but that’s one of the most enjoyable parts about the writing process with Meshiaak. We never stop pushing the boundaries for ourselves and seeing where we can take something. I love the creative part of it all.”

With a record you can put it on and hear it, feel it even. But sometimes you really need to listen, take it in as a whole, process and think about it. ‘Mask Of All Misery’ is one of those albums. “People will take what they chose to at the end of the day,” ponders Camilleri. “But, I’ve found by talking with a lot of fans that they do pay attention and really digest the content of our music. It’s an amazing feeling when someone connects to it through hearing it and then gets even deeper because they can connect with the content as well.. goes to show you that you are never alone.”

TRACKLISTING
1. Miasma
2. Mask Of All Misery
3. Bury The Bodies
4. City Of Ghosts
5. Face Of Stone
6. Tears That Burn The Son
7. Doves
8. In The Final Hour
9. Adrena
10. Godless

Positive Grid unveils Spark, the smart voice-activated guitar amp


Positive Grid Unveils Spark: The Smart Guitar Amplifier and App Featuring Intelligent Technology

Intelligent guitar amplifier and proprietary voice-activated app generate real-time practice tools and backing accompaniment. Limited pre-order specials are available now.

San Diego, CA, October 30, 2019 – Positive Grid announces Spark, a smart guitar amp and accompanying app (iOS/Android) driven by intelligent technology to offer real-time Smart Jam accompaniment, Auto Chord detection and intuitive practice features for players of all levels. Spark also functions as a full-range, 40-Watt combo amp and features a variety of tone-shaping options plus amp and fx modeling built upon the company’s award-winning BIAS engine.High value pre-order limited specials for Spark are available now here: positivegrid.com/spark

Guitarists can play and practice using the Spark’s Auto Chord feature to access millions of songs on popular streaming platforms like Spotify, YouTube and Apple Music. The Spark app automatically analyzes and displays chords for millions of songs in real time, and its easy-to-use controls let the player slow down the song’s tempo or loop a difficult section to practice.

Jamming is easy and fun with Spark’s Smart Jam feature. The Spark amp and app work together to learn the player’s style and feel, and then automatically generate bass and drum accompaniments that act like a virtual band – anytime, anywhere. Best of all, the Spark app can be used without lifting a finger. It responds to a variety of voice commands to stream a rock song or a blues backing track, ask for a virtual band to follow the user’s playing, and more.

As a guitar amp, Spark features a deep, loud and immersive speaker design with two custom-designed speakers and a tuned bass-reflex port that are engineered to provide deep, full-sounding basses and crystal-clear highs for every style of music.

Spark also boasts a full amp modeling and multi-effects engine powered by Positive Grid’s award-winning BIAS tone engine to provide realistic virtual tube amps and effects. Players can dial in pristine melodies, crunchy chords or soaring leads for electric guitar; deep, thunderous tones for bass; and a bright and full-bodied sound for acoustic guitar. Players have access to over 10,000 guitar and bass amp-and-FX programs from famous guitarists, session players, studio engineers and producers from around the world via Positive Grid’s ToneCloud community.

For added versatility and authentic feel, Spark also has bass, mid and treble tone stack controls; dedicated knobs for mod, delay and reverb effects; a built-in tuner and tap tempo; plus Bluetooth connectivity for streaming music in hi def audio via the Spark app. You can easily load up to four custom amp-and-FX setups into the Spark amp’s user program locations for instant access to your favorite sounds.

Spark can be used as a USB audio interface for easily recording on a computer. It even comes with PreSonus Studio One Prime recording software for free, allowing players to get started right out of the box.

High value early bird pre-order limited specials for Spark are available now here: positivegrid.com/spark

Find out more at positivegrid.com/spark

Check out the names on this autographed guitar being auctioned to help Jerry Donahue after his stroke


Some of the biggest names in rock and roll including Sir Paul McCartney, Robert Plant, Eric Clapton, Jeff Beck, Jimmy Page, Steve Winwood, Mark Knopfler, Pete Townshend, Albert Lee, David Gilmour, Joe Brown, Richard Thomson and Dave Pegg have signed a guitar to be auctioned in honour of stroke victim Jerry Donahue.

In 2016, American guitarist Jerry Donahue suffered a catastrophic stroke, almost certainly ending his career as one of the world’s finest folk-rock guitarists. The former Fairport Convention, Fotheringay and Hellecasters guitarist, was regarded by the music media as an extremely talented musician with an extraordinary technical approach to string bending.

Always in demand as a session player and always with the love of his life, the Telecaster guitar, Jerry Donahue performed and recorded with dozens of major artists. The late great Danny Gatton once referred to Jerry Donahue as “The string bending king of the planet”.

“To have so many famous signatures on this guitar is a fantastic achievement,” says close friend Dave Pegg, bassist in Fairport convention. “We know that the guitar will raise many thousands of pounds and all the money raised from the auction will go towards Jerry’s rehabilitation in the USA.”

The guitar itself, donated by John Hornby Skewes Ltd., is Jerry Donahue’s own Vintage Signature V58, built to his own specifications as a collaboration with specialist guitar and hardware designer Trevor Wilkinson and JHS Managing Director Dennis Drumm.

Features include a maple fingerboard and neck and an American alder body finished in Ash Blonde and Jerry’s signature pickup and tone control layout.

Dave Pegg continues, “It all started when I had a call from guitarist Matt Worley, another close friend of Jerry’s, he’d acquired Jerry’s Signature guitar with the idea to have a few big names sign it so we could raise some money for him.”
“At first we just asked a handful of people,” Matt Worley explains. “And with help from Tony Kelsey who co-opted the likes of Steve Winwood, Robert Plant, Andy Fairweather Low and Dave Pegg himself, word got out, the gates opened and we were swamped with some of the biggest names in the music business eager to autograph the guitar and pay their respects to Jerry.
Even Sir Paul McCartney and they’re still coming in, Tony Iommi, Jeff Lynn, Martin Barre, John Paul Jones and we’ve just squeezed in Brian Wilson and Al Jardine from The Beach Boys. The guitar is more or less full now, so we are moving on to the guitar case.

There are some very rare signings as well, some who never sign anything and as far as we know, this is the first collective signing of all three guitarists who were in The Yardbirds; Eric Clapton, Jimmy Page and Jeff Beck. The three remaining members of Led Zeppelin are on there and of course, diehard fans will remember Eric Clapton played with Steve Winwood in Blind Faith, the first of the ‘supergroups in ‘69’ ”

There are not many collectables in the world that are as cool as guitars and the auction, to be held at Gardiner Houlgate’s in Bath, UK Auction rooms, on 11th December 2019, is expected to attract attention from collectors and music fans from all over the world.

GARDINER HOULGATE.
The Specialist Auctioneers.
+44 (0)1225 812912
+44 (0)1225 812612
auctions@gardinerhoulgate.co.uk

https://www.gardinerhoulgate.co.uk/