GUEST POST: Top 10 Best Electric Guitar Players off All Time by John Anthony

By John Anthony of Guitar.Listy

When it comes to rank the musicians it is always tough. Different people have different choice and there will always be a controversy about who should be number one and who should be at ten. Still in this article a list of the top ten best electric guitarist is done keeping in mind their fame and the enigma they have created with their music. There are so many electric guitar players who have won hearts of millions over the years. Here are few of them who have left a lasting impression. 

1. Stevie Ray Vaughan

When Stevie Ray Vaughan comes with guitars in his hands even God will take some time to listen to him. He may be deeply rooted to the blues idiom but he had taken music especially electric guitar to another level that is purely original. He is inspired by other guitarists like Jimi Hendrix, B.B King and Albert Collins but he himself have influenced many others during his time. Among different styles his lighting fast double stop and triple string bends are something that are unforgettable. He has sprinkled his art in many songs that includes ‘pride and joy,’ ‘rude ‘mood’ and others but ‘Texas flood’ is something that took him to new heights. 

2. Jimi Hendrix

Considered as the great instrumentalist in the history of music Jimi Hendrix became active during the late 60s. He was something that was not seen before whether that be his volume use or wah pedals. He was the one who had blurred and radicalized the lines that had been demarcating rock and roll from the psychedelic experiments. His music piece ‘bold as love’ makes his audience awestricken and his guitar seems to be a part of him, such was his integrity was guitar! After Eric Clapton saw him he considered that it was the end of his career! Technically, it may be possible to find many other guitarists who are impressive than Jimi but when it comes to spirit very few comes near him. 

3. Chuck Berry

Chuck Berry is considered as the God of Rock and Roll and why shouldn’t he be? It was his amalgamation of blues with the hillbilly guitar that has pioneered the music famously known as ‘rock and roll’ now. He stands apart from other guitarist for the skills he had shown in synthesizing blues, rhythm, rock, country and jazz. His technique was sharp and perfect and the tone was very melodic. The back and forth bends by Berry on carols has been inspiration for many and is imitated by numerous electric guitar players round the world.  If you want to learn how to play an electric guitar then follow this article about how to play electric guitar for beginners on GuitarListy.com

4. Duane Allman

Duane Allman was always brilliant. He had shown his performance while playing as musician at Muscle Shoals studio or while as one of the lead guitarists of the Allman Brothers band. Whether it was his standard playing or the slide playing, the music was something that was smoothest and of course the most adventurous that the world has listened to. There are many pieces that has been mesmerizing music lovers but “the Allman brother live” will surely make one fall in love with him again, especially the one at the Fillmore East. 

5. Eric Clapton

Eric was mainly a Blues guitarist and it was his impressive blues playing that has made his fans making spray paints on the walls of London. Once John Mayall’s ‘Beano” album was released with his blues rock playing he was considered as the God of electric guitar. It was his solo, ‘while my guitar gently weeps’ in the Beatles that made him popular and inscribed his name in history of music permanently. He is also known as ‘Slowhand’ and he has been in the hall of fame of music three times. He had played with Derek. Cream and the Dominos and with all these music along with his solos has earned him the supreme position in the world of music. 

6. Chet Atkins

For those who had not heard Chet Atkins before are missing something in their life. He was a rockabilly player and loved playing his songs himself. He was a skilled instrumental guitar player and loved to play his music himself, without any support from other musicians. “Mr. Sandman” is a great example of his talent. He have created many other pieces that have made him popular and have given him this position. Still he is more famous for his syncopated melodies and alternating thumb rhythm that shows his precision while handling the instruments. 

7. Slash

Slash has rendered innumerable solos and among them ‘Estranged,’ ‘Sweet Child O’ Mine,’ or ‘November Rain’ are worth mentioning. Saul Hudson, or famously known as Slash was lead guitarist of the band, Guns N’ Roses. He was an iconic guitarist who had played solos as well as group performance that had kept music lovers mesmerized. He has even performed with Michael Jackson on the stage and that was an experience indeed. “Black and white’ had fulfilled the wishes of the masses when they had seen two maestros performing together on the stage. His mountain top grandeur solos and blues have taken the music lovers to climax many times. He gradually turned up the intensity of the music making things more intense. 

8. Charlie Christian

Many music lovers considered him as the first master of the electric guitar. He was an excellent jazz player and the stellar improvisational skills shown by Charlie Cristian was exemplary. He has created some of the most innovative and inventive jazz of all time with his fluent run down through the fret board. “Swing to Bop” will give an example how he has impressed his followers for ages. 

9. Prince

Prince is included in this list for his extraordinary solo on “let’s go crazy.” He is a guitarists who has shown his supremacy in blues, rhythm, funk and Minneapolis genres. He may be more famous for his frenetic style but there are ones like “while my guitar gently weeps or “just my imagination” that shows that he had ability to play under control. “While my Guitar gently weeps” has been a heart rendering piece that had made every guitar lover fall to knees. 

10. Frank Zappa

Frank Zappa was not only an electric guitar player but had many other qualities in him. He was a writer who wrote hilariously satirical lyrics. Apart from that eh has composed many brilliant music pieces and of course he is included in this list because of his inventive and innovative guitar playing. He has made many guitar improvisation with his lighting hands fretting. 

Def Leppard – Let’s Throw A Rock At A Dick

So I was just in the car with my son and a Def Leppard song came on Spotify. And he goes “Def Leppard? Isn’t that the band you have a setlist for where all the songs are like ‘Rock Rock Til You Drop’ and ‘Let’s Get Rocked’ and ‘Rock Of Ages’ and ‘Let’s Throw A Rock At A Dick’?”

So now I really want to know what a Def Leppard song called ‘Let’s Throw A Rock At A Dick’ sounds like. I mean you could probably get it to work to the tune of ‘Pour Some Sugar On Me.’ But I’m issuing a challenge to Def Leppard. Let’s hear it! Actually write ‘Let’s Throw A Rock At A Dick’! It’ll be an instant classic! Let’s go-o-o-oo-o!

Order Your Prestige Guitars Devin Townsend ‘Empath’ Acoustic

One of the nicest damn guitars I saw at NAMM last month was the prototype for Devin Townsend’s new Prestige Guitars ‘EMPATH’ signature acoustic. The neck and the body bevelling are ridiculously comfortable and the sound is gorgeous: clear, full and sweet. Prestige is now taking advance orders for this beauty, which is limited to 100 guitars worldwide.

The Empath Acoustic is a hand built Dreadnought cutaway guitar, featuring a Torrefied Adirondack Spruce Top, Indian Rosewood Back and Sides, and 3A Flame Maple Bevels on the Arm Rest, Back Rest and Cutaway. Following an all-organic build, each Empath guitar is built with a hand carved Mahogany Neck; Ebony Fingerboard, Ebony Bridge, Bone Nut and Saddle, and a natural Satin Finish. This combination results in a rich soulful sound, with crisp overtones and Loud sonic definition.

And how’s this for cool: each guitar will include a numbered, handwritten autographed letter from Devin, hidden inside the soundhole. Each letter is a fragment of a bigger story arc which is revealed when each letter is placed in numerical order. Empath owners are encouraged to register their guitar online to connect the story.

If you’d like to order one and be part of something really cool, visit this page on the Prestige website.

Cool Gear Alert: Marshall Studio Series

About 10 years ago Marshall released some adorable itty bitty baby 1-watt amps. They were cool and all, but it was the height of ‘lunchbox amps rule’ and I don’t think they ever really caught on. Part of the reason was probably that the power sections just weren’t the same as the amps they were based on, so they just didn’t feel quite right. Aah but now Marshall has taken that idea, blown it up, crammed appropriate power sections into ’em and created some truly desirable, useful and just plain frickin’ awesome amps in the form of the Studio Series.
The line currently consists of three models: 20-watt variants of the Plexi (SV20), JCM800 (SC20) and Jubilee. Each is available in either head or combo form, are made in the UK and are packed with the tone of their big brothers. They each contain two EL34 power-amp valves and can be switched down from 20 to 5 watts. And another thing I really like about these amps is that the combo versions each have their own cabinet designs rather than just building the different designs into the same chassis.

I love the idea of these amps. I’d be so tempted to run two Plexis side by side to rattle some windows and piss off some neighbours. Or imagine having a Jubilee for crunchy rhythm tones and a JCM800 for leads. Oh the fun you could have!

Rusty Cooley Joins Ormsby Guitars

So, my day job these days is Artist Relations and Social Media guy for the wonderful Ormsby Guitars, and I’ve just got back from NAMM where we had the huge honour of working with Rusty Cooley and Dino Cazares to unveil their new signature models.

Below is the press release I wrote to get the word out ahead of the show (and a whole bunch of pics by the wonderful Beto Branger), but now that I’ve had time to play Rusty’s guitar and get to know it, I thought I’d share my first-hand experience with this incredible instrument. So far this is Custom Shop guitar is the only instrument we’ve made for Rusty, but it’ll be available later this year from both the Custom Shop and the production GTR Series.

It was very important to Rusty that his guitar have unrestricted upper-fret access so not only does the RC-ONE have completely free access up to the 24th fret, but it goes three better: you can get your pinkie finger all the way up to the 27th fret with your thumb still parallel behind your fretting fingers. The neck joint is super-sculpted for easy access, and the upper frets are partially scalloped to give you extra grip on the high notes. And the neck is super thin. Like, ridiculously thin, but very stable.

This particular multiscale design uses the bridge as the neutral point of the fret fan, meaning you can use a Floyd Rose or any other standard tremolo or hardtail bridge while still getting the benefits of multiscale on the low strings. You can shred like crazy on the high strings while the low strings are tight and punchy. It’s really fun playing riffs on this thing.

A few people have asked about the pickup placement and whether the neck pickup really sounds like a neck pickup, being so far back from the traditional neck position. I can confirm that it does indeed sound ‘necky’ but the location gives it a little more definition and more harmonic overtones than a typical neck pickup. I really dig it.

I love the Ormsby guitars I’m currently playing but man, once these come out I’ve gotta get one. Those who are familiar with my playing know that I’m a big Floyd-Rose-and-seven-string guy, and this really is the ultimate guitar for players like me.

ORMSBY GUITARS WELCOMES GUITAR VIRTUOSO RUSTY COOLEY

PERTH, WESTERN AUSTRALIA (January 23, 2019)Ormsby Guitars, a pioneer in multiscale electric guitars, welcomes guitar virtuoso Rusty Cooley to its family of artists.

Cooley is always pushing the boundaries of what the guitar can do, and he needs an instrument that can keep up with his creativity and technique. “A good friend of mine turned me on to Ormsby guitars and I was immediately intrigued,” Cooley says. “The guitar played great and had a very cutting-edge and innovative look. After speaking with Perry I knew this was the right move for me. Finally a guitar builder with the vision to go where no-one else has ever been, and the balls to do it!”

“Rusty and I are on the same wavelength when it comes to pushing the boundaries of guitar design,” luthier Perry Ormsby says. “When we began designing Rusty’s new guitar, we spent hours on Skype discussing everything from upper fret access to headstock shape to the perfect control location, to shared inspirations like Randy Rhoads. This is an instrument that really captures the excitement and passion of both playing and making guitars.”

“I’ve always likened my guitars to high-performance cars like a Lamborghini, but what we’re working with now is clearly alien technology,” Cooley says. 

A Rusty Cooley signature model electric guitar is in the works which not only meets Rusty’s demand for the ultimate in upper fret access; it exceeds it by providing completely unrestricted access all the way up to the 27th fret. This 7-string instrument features 26.5” to 27.5” multiscale, Floyd Rose Pro 7 vibrato, partially-scalloped frets, glow-in-the-dark fretboard inlays and a unique Ormsby-designed, angled locking nut. You can play Rusty’s prototype at the Ormsby NAMM booth, #2841.

First-Timer’s Guide To NAMM

It’s that time of year again where tens of thousands of music industry professionals, rock stars and hopeful dreamers converge upon Anaheim, California for NAMM – the National Association of Music Merchants trade show. It’s where musical instrument companies – a lot of musical instrument companies – showcase their newest gear to the world’s retailers, distributors and media; where hopeful designers and luthiers present their ideas to prospective investors; where musicians pitch themselves to potential endorsement partners; where historic jams take place; and where you can’t turn a corner without bumping into a legendary rock star, producer, or builder. Or, if you’re unlucky, Andy Dick. And it’s also pretty damned intimidating for NAMM first-timers. This upcoming NAMM will be my tenth and I’ve learned a few tricks to navigating this overwhelming schmoozefest so if you’re going to NAMM for the first time this year, I hope you find this guide helpful.

How To Get In
For starters, NAMM is pretty hard to get into. It’s industry-only, which typically means you need to be associated with an attending company or be in the media in order to get a badge. Occasionally, stores might have a handful of passes that they give to favoured customers. Once you do have your registration, it’s a good idea to pick up your badge early – that is, before doors open on the morning of the Thursday that NAMM officially begins on. If not, you could be waiting in line for a long time. If you get to Anaheim a few days early you’ll be able to pick up your badge in advance and it’ll make life a lot smoother for you on show day. Also, lot of people refer to the Sunday as ‘Public Day’ which just isn’t true – maybe it was many years ago? – so don’t just rock up on Sunday demanding to be let in.

Where To Stay
If you’re heading to NAMM this January you’ve probably already got accommodation sorted out (right? RIGHT?), but if you haven’t you’d better get on it! NAMM is held at the Anaheim Convention Center, just a stone’s throw from Disneyland, so there are plenty of hotels around for all budgets, and a buttload of AirBNBs. Some advice make sure you check if your hotel is on a NAMM shuttle bus route. It’ll make your life a lot easier. You’ll be doing a lot of walking throughout the day and the last thing you want is to be walking back to your hotel after a long, long day of schmoozing, and some of the hotels are a bit of a schlep.

Oh and Disneyland is relatively quiet at this time of year, at least compared to summer, so if you want to take a break from NAMM by throwing yourself around on a roller coaster or zooming around the galaxy in Star Tours, have at it!

nammpic

What To Eat
Because NAMM is so close to Disneyland you’ll find plenty of wallet-friendly meal options in the neighbourhood, including Denny’s, IHOP, Tony Romo’s, McDonalds and all that stuff. Just the thing to shove some greasy breakfast down your throat while taking advantage of free WiFi before a long day of NAMMing. And Downtown Disney is a retail and dining section of the Disneyland Resort that is open to the public without an entry fee, so you’ll find plenty of dining options there. And the Convention Center itself has various places to eat and drink including various coffee and beer stalls, places to grab a burger or a salad or a slice of pizza, and a whole bunch of food trucks outside. There are also Starbuckses in the Hilton and Sheraton, and at the Hilton you’ll find a food court with Sbarro, Baja Fresh, Submarina and Just Grillin’. If you’d like to get away from the Convention Center there are plenty of great restaurants all throughout the wider area. Gabbi’s Mexican Kitchen in Orange is spectacular if you can handle a bit of a wait at busy times.

What To Do
Your very first NAMM can be quite overwhelming. There’s a lot to take in. There’ll be tens of thousands of people roaming the halls, a few hundred dudes playing Vai covers, buxom promotional models handing out flyers or posing for pics, and the persistent distant thrash of cymbals (It’s kind of like in Lord Of The Rings as they get closer to Mordor and they can see the fire in the distance and everything starts to grow dark… the closer you get to the drum section, the more the survival instincts kick in and you might find yourself trying to fend off Orcs reps with a cymbal stand or something).

If you’re planning to go to all four days of NAMM, Thursday is where a lot of business gets done and is pretty busy. Friday is very busy and with more signings, appearances, performances and launches. And Saturday is absolutely crazycakes, a huge crowded cacophony of noise. Saturday is when you’re likely to find yourself muttering, randomly sobbing, and saying things you would never, ever say at any other time in your life, such as “Oh shit, Steve Vai’s just showed up at Ernie Ball – better take the long way around or it’ll take me an hour to get through the crowd.” And Sunday is pretty quiet, especially in the afternoon. It’s tempting to be all like “Dammit, I’m staying to the very end to wring out every last drop of awesomeness from this experience,” but NAMM after about 2PM Sunday is a bit of a downer as companies start to slowly begin packing up.

If you’re at NAMM to work, it’s all about meetings, meetings, meetings. If you’re booking meetings with company reps in advance and you’re not already in California, here’s a tip for travellers which could save your ass: write them down on paper or in a text file: don’t immediately pop them in your smartphone calendar because – as I learned at my first NAMM – my iPhone scheduled all my appointments in Melbourne time and didn’t adjust for the fact that I was in LA! iOS is a lot better at these stuff nowadays but why risk it, right?

If you’re hoping to hit up some of the approximately 8 billion artist signings happening during the show it’s best to check the social media accounts of your favourite players and gear companies for schedules. And there are all sorts of performances going on all the time, some of them listed on the NAMM website and some of them more spontaneous. Make sure you pace yourself and give yourself plenty of time in case meetings run long. Get your hands on a floor plan of the convention center or the official NAMM smartphone app so you can figure out who’s where, and how far your appointments are from each other.

Oh and dude, business cards. Don’t fall into the ‘Oh nobody needs business cards any more’ trap. If you have ’em, bring ’em. I can’t tell you the number of times I’ve looked back at my post-NAMM pile of business cards and remembered a piece of gear or a new contact that would otherwise have faded into the fog of memory.

The other great thing to do at NAMM is to play NAMM Bingo.

Oh and wear comfortable shoes. Seriously. I shit the not, every NAMM I lose about 5kg from all the walking. By the third day your feet are likely to feel like a pair of tenderised steaks flopping about on the end of your legs. So think ahead! Maybe pack some kind of foot-soak to rest your feet in after your last evening. One of my favourite things in the world is the moment of serene solitude on a NAMM Sunday night, making a foot soak in a bathtub, maybe lighting some candles and reading a book and just not being blasted by the combined noise of the entire musical instrument industry being under one roof.

After Hours
Many companies have VIP events at NAMM, especially on the Friday and Saturday nights. A lot of these are secret and you’ll need to be on good terms with someone at the company to score an invite. Maybe don’t just go up to someone you’ve never met before and immediately ask if they’re putting on an event, but don’t be too shy to ask after you’ve had a nice chat either.

Even if you can’t get into a secret gig, party or dinner you’ll find plenty of great events around town. And after dark, the lobbies of the Hilton and Sheraton right outside the convention centre are great places to catch gigs and jams, have a beer with a favourite player, network with some new contacts or, once you’ve been to a few NAMMs, catch up with old pals. Some of the best times I’ve had at NAMM have been at these loose, informal get-togethers in the outdoor area just behind the Sheraton bar. Oh and karaoke at the Clarion? Unbeatable.

Hall E
Make sure you go out of your way to check out Hall E downstairs. This is where you’ll find some of the more offbeat builders, tinkerers and designers as well as incredible boutique luthiers and pedal companies. You’ll see some pretty out-there ideas for new gadgets that their designers think will revolutionize guitar, and maybe they will, maybe they won’t, but it’s always enlightening. Every now and then you’ll see something utterly ridiculous that you just know will never, ever catch on, but try not to be a dick about it.

So There You Have It.
If you’re a first-time NAMMer, hopefully this will help you to wrap your head around it before you go in, so you can make the most of your time. Personally I look back on my first NAMM and just think of how overwhelming it all seemed. My fist NAMM was basically a lot of “OMG! WTF! EEEK! WHOA! HUH!” My second was more like “Okay… starting to get into the groove now…” and every one since has been like “Aaah, I’m home.”

If you have any NAMM tips you’d like to share, feel free to leave a comment.

Cool Video Alert: Ando San Washington – Vitality

Check out the new video by Incipience guitarist Ando San Washington for the track ‘Vitality’ from his EP of the same name. Ando is an incredible guitarist with an enviable mastery of thump techniques, and this song also features a gorgeously fusion-riffic guest solo from Hedras Ramos. And the video is filmed by the legendary Felix Martin. Ando is an Ormsby Guitars endorser and he’s playing a HypeGTR 8-string Dragonburst in this video.

You can pick up Vitality here.



New Premium Ibanez Jem Brings Back Ebony Fretboard

The Ibanez JEM7VWH has been Steve Vai’s main instrument since it was released at the time of the Sex & Religion album in 1993. Upon release it had a Lo Pro Edge tremolo, an Ebony fingerboard and Vai’s new DiMarzio Evolution humbucking pickups. Since then the VWH has undergone a few changes, including the switch to an Edge Pro tremolo and then to an original Edge, but by far the biggest change that really riled up the Jem community when it happened was the decision to move from an Ebony fingerboard to a Rosewood one in 2004. Sure, this gave the Jem a slightly warmer tone (which helped to cool down those very aggressive Evolutions) but many players preferred the more direct tone and smooth feel of Ebony. 

Now Ibanez is releasing a Premium version of the JEM7VWH, the JEM7VP, which brings back that sweet sweet Ebony fingerboard. There are a couple of other key differences between this and the Japan-made VWH though: it has Jumbo frets and a 5-piece Maple/Walnut Wizard neck instead of the JEM neck shape and narrow/tall 6105 frets, and the Premium’s fingerboard radius is a little more subtly rounded than the VWH.

I can imagine a lot of players being very happy with this model. A) It’s more affordable than the VWH which is a seriously-priced piece of kit; B) Yay Ebony; C) The smaller frets and flatter radius of the WVH just don’t feel as Ibanezzy to players who are used to the RG neck. One point to note: it does not have scallops on frets 21-24.

This is also pretty smart marketing by Ibanez. It gives players something in between the top-of-the-line JEM7VWH and the budget JEM Jr, a guitar that a lot of folks buy to upgrade to more VWH-like specs. 

I used to have a VWH and while it was a phenomenal guitar, eventually I traded it for a Strat because it just never really felt like ‘mine.’ But I’m certainly tempted to get the JEM7VP because there will always be a place in my heart for the white Jem, and I think I would like this model’s neck a little more. What do you think?