Ernie Ball Music Man St Vincent Signature

stv

St. Vincent is such a great guitarist and such a compelling artist overall, and very deserving of a signature guitar. She’s been playing Ernie Ball Music Man Albert Lee models recently and now Music Man and St. Vincent have teamed up for a bold new guitar design. There are a few little hints of existing models too: the bridge appears to be the one from the John Petrucci Majesty and the V carve of the top is reminiscent of the Armada. But the overall design is very original and it looks to be really functional too. It must be an utter blast to play and I can’t wait to check it out.

From the Music Man website: Read More …

Hello, Old Friend…

Today I was over at Davis Music Centre in Footscray, Melbourne to return a lovely FGN J-Standard Odyssey I’ve been reviewing, and I got to visit the very same Ernie Ball Music Man Albert Lee MM90 guitar that I reviewed a few months ago. It was really cool to see it again! It’s a beautiful guitar, and whoever ends up taking it home will be very, very happy.

Here it is on the wall at the store…

ebmm albert lee mm90

And here it is back when it was visiting my house…

Music Man Albert Lee MM90

And here’s what it sounds like!

REVIEW: Ernie Ball Music Man Albert Lee MM90


Have you seen the movie The Grand Budapest Hotel? You have? Right. Well y’know how Zero Moustafa can’t bring himself to talk about his fiancé Agatha because it makes him too emotional? That’s how I feel about this guitar. Just writing about it now – knowing that it’s not mine and I’ll probably never get to own it or one like it because frankly they’re priced at what they’re worth and they’re worth a lot – brings a bittersweet tear to my eye. I’ve played other Music Man Albert Lee models over the years and quite liked them (St. Vincent does too – look for her playing a twin-humbucker version). I’ve even reviewed them here. And of course Albert Lee himself is an absolute guitar master who can hand no less a player than Steve Morse his ass – just look at this footage of Lee and Morse at the Ernie Ball 50th Anniversary party for proof – but there’s something magical about this particular version of Albert Lee’s signature model Music Man, even compared to the single coil and humbucker versions. Read More …

REVIEW: Ernie Ball Music Man Albert Lee HH

Country guitarist Albert Lee is a freak. One of the true greats able to play totally in the pocket in a very tasteful, rhythmic manner – as those who were lucky enough to see him at the recent Ernie Ball 50th Anniversary party can attest – then slice your head off with a seemingly impossible flurry of speedy yet purposeful notes. Lee’s longstanding signature Ernie Ball Music Man guitar is much the same: both restrained and outrageous, traditional and exotic. The most common, three-single-coil configuration displays an obvious lineage to the Fender Stratocaster but to think of it as just a pointy Strat is to do the guitar a great disservice. And that fact is driven home even further by the EBMM Albert Lee HH model.

The twin-humbucker HH has the same basic outline as the triple single coil version, with its angular body horns and a very ‘designy’ forearm contour which follows the path set in motion by the slope of the top edge of the cutaway. The body is made of African Mahogany, finished in a high gloss polyester and available in all of EBMM’s Standard Classic Colours range. The company goes to great pains to ensure that all guitars weigh in within a specific range – around 2.95kg, give or take a little, or 0.2kg more for the tremolo version, ensuring consistency from guitar to guitar.

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REVIEW: Ernie Ball Music Man Big Al Bass

The Ernie Ball Music Man Albert Lee model guitar is one of the company’s most unusual instruments – and that’s saying something for the company that also gave us the wacky yet awesome Bongo bass. While the Lee model takes certain obvious design cues from the Stratocaster, it’s also unmistakably EBMM. For starters there’s the split 2/4 headstock, the five-bolt neck joint, and the matte feel of the back of the neck (a gunstock oil and hand-rubbed special wax blend) which ends abruptly at the back of the headstock. Then there’s there’s the angular body shape, which is unlike anything else out there. (Personally I’ve often fantasized about this shape being used for a Floyd Rose-loaded, aggressive metal machine, maybe with seven strings). Lee may be a country player, and a freaking amazing one at that, but that doesn’t mean his signature guitar design isn’t cool enough for other styles too.

And that leads us to the Big Al bass. Albert Lee isn’t a bass player, but his angular, pointy signature guitar design makes a cracking bass. Interestingly, the bass version started life as a gift to EBMM’s Sterling Ball. The Big Al’s body is made of African mahogany, finished in a high-gloss polyester. (The pickguard is available in black or white as standard, but options include shell, white pearloid, vintage white, pearloid or black pearloid). The bridge is a Music Man chrome-plated, hardened steel bridge plate with stainless steel saddles. The scale length is 34″.

CLICK HERE to buy the Ernie Ball Music Man Big Al Bass from Musician’s Friend.

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