Robb Flynn Reunited With Stolen Guitars

This is so great. So, so great.

From the YouTube description:

Back in 2010 Robb Flynn’s Martinez, CA house was burglarized. Stolen with the cash, jewelry, and other items were four guitars, and amongst these four was easily one of his most meaningful possession, a 1997 Washburn Dimebolt guitar that was given to him onstage at the Aragon Ballroom in Chicago, by the late-great Pantera guitarist, Dimebag Darrell.

Last night, some six years later, it was returned to him along with an un-released Epiphone prototype.

How?

When Holly Cherry put a $10 dollar online bid to buy an unclaimed storage unit in San Bernardino, she had no idea what she would find. Tucked away in said storage unit she discovered that it had two electric guitars. So like anyone she went about getting a valuation on them, luckily the un-released Epiphone Signature Series prototype had Robb Flynn’s autograph on the back. Using the Google Translate App to take a photo of the name it eventually pulled up various stories on the theft.

Emailing some photos over to Bryan Kehoe at Jim Dunlop Strings and Pedals (long-time sponsors of Machine Head). Bryan then forwarded the pics to Robb’s high school buddy Craig Locicero who Robb performed with in the band Forbidden before Machine Head who contacted Robb.

Opening the email, Flynn was stunned to find photos of two of the four guitars, including the beloved Dimebolt. Flynn explained, “I’ve had so many false leads over the last 6 years I can’t even tell you, literally hundreds, and while was grateful for everyone’s enthusiasm in helping find them, but I had kind of given up hope.” Adds Flynn, “you can imagine my shock when that email came through and it was really them! I was sitting in our son Wyatt’s gymnastics class waiting for it to start and I blurted out ‘HOLY S**T, they found my guitars!’ My kids laughed and said ‘what what?’”

Contacting Holly, she agreed to meet Robb in Oakland where the guitars were returned, miraculously, in near perfect condition considering they were stolen without a case, and only missing one volume knob.

In closing Flynn added, “I’d like to thank Holly Cherry for being so amazing throughout this entire process, she truly is an outstanding human being. I’d also like to thank Officer Ian Leong of the Martinez Police Dept. who has stayed on the case for over 6 years, and has been unrelenting in hunting down the thieves. Lastly huge, huge, HUGE props go out to Craig Locicero and Bryan Kehoe for contacting me with this info, and also to Chris Wallace and Wes Anderson for connecting the dots. The Ibanez guitar that I used to write and record Machine Head’s debut ‘Burn My Eyes’ is still out there missing, so I’m asking all the Head Cases to keep their eyes peeled. But for now, the Dimebolt is home and it’s moments like these that make you believe man, they make you believe!”

INTERVIEW: Machine Head’s Robb Flynn

The Blackening was an unstoppable juggernaut of metal power for Machine Head. Conceived in 2005 and released in 2007, it kept the band on the road for quite literally years. But all good things must come to an end. And so finally, in the year of our lord 2011, Machine Head present Unto The Locust. Produced by Robb Flynn at Green Day’s Jingletown Studios, it’s a surprisingly diverse album which tempers its thrash edge with classical influences, wild mood swings, laser-focused precision, blunt-force-trauma riffage and some of Flynn’s best ever vocal performances. It may be hard to ever forget The Blackening and the way it captured the charred hearts of both modern and old-school metal fans in equal measure, but Unto The Locust its own animal and it makes neither concessions nor apologies for its history-making predecessor. It simply gets on with it in its own kickass way.

So I guess the question everyone wants to know the answer to is, did you have The Blackening‘s success in mind when you started working on this one, or did you try to ignore it? 

We definitely didn’t have The Blackening in mind at all. We lived that moment for so long. It was an amazing moment, but when it was done, we were really excited to start writing again. You’ve got to remember, when we started writing The Blackening, it was August of 2005. And we started writing for this record in June of 2010, so five years had passed. We were ready to write, and we were ready to create a new moment.

It was almost like that album wouldn’t let itself die, y’know? It just kept going and going.

Yeah! It was amazing. It was an incredible moment. The Slipknot tours, Metallica tours, Grammy nominations. It was an endless stream of good news! It was really amazing, but it just went on for a while. We were lucky enough to finish the tour in Australia. That was the last dates of the whole album cycle. The last show we played in Sydney. It was killer, a great way to end it, and we totally went triumphant into the writing sessions. We were really charged up.

I really dig the classical guitar influence on the new album. I understand you actually took classical lessons?

I did. I actually took classical guitar in high school. It was an elective I had to take and I mainly just smoked a lot of weed and played Black Sabbath songs. Haha. I got a C minus, which isn’t a very good grade. It’s below average. I guess I showed that teacher, huh? Haha. But it really got my mind into that mindset of playing it, and once I really started playing I always leaned towards classical players. Like, I always liked Richie Blackmore, and Randy Rhoads in particular was a massive influence. Randy Rhoads on the first two Ozzy albums brought a lot of classical vibes and that was a huge influence. So between that and Jimi Hendrix, Black Sabbath, those were pretty much my main masters.

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