Kirk Hammett Goes Poly With Gibson And ESP

Kirk Hammett has signed on with Gibson (and not for the first time: he had a signature Flying V about 10 years ago), but he will also continue to use ESP.

My guess is that the press release below hints at some of the releases we might possibly expect: reproductions of Kirk’s 1979 Flying V and the ‘Greeny’ 1959 Les Paul previously owned by Peter Greene and Gary Moore. I reckon we’ll also see a black Les Paul Custom with EMGs, cos Kirk’s been playing one of those forever.

It’s cool of Gibson to name-check Fender, ESP and Jackson in the press release too. The Gibson of the ‘new regime’ seems to be going out of its way to be a part of the guitar community, whereas under the previous leadership it all seemed pretty insular.

Okay, now get Hetfield.

Here’s the press release:

NASHVILLE, TN (July 29, 2021) Gibson, the iconic American instrument brand, has announced an official brand partnership with Kirk Hammett of Metallica, one of the most iconic rock guitarists today. The new partnership will span across Gibson Brands including Gibson and Epiphone guitars.

“It’s a really great and exciting time for me to be joining forces with Gibson,” says Kirk Hammett. “I look forward to achieving great things together in the future.”

“It’s an honor to welcome the icon, the ripper, Kirk Hammett back to the Gibson family,” says Cesar Gueikian, Brand President, Gibson Brands. “Kirk has been carrying the flag for hard rock and heavy metal for decades, and his Gibson guitars have been there with him from the very beginning. From his first Gibson, his 1979 Flying V to ‘Greeny’ and everything in between, Gibson guitars have been an integral part of Kirk’s sound. All of us at Gibson are looking forward to this collaboration and are grateful that Kirk has trusted us to begin a new partnership.”

Watch and share the new interview with Kirk Hammett and Cesar Gueikian (Brand President, Gibson Brands) on Gibson TV, Today, Thursday, July 29, at 10am PT, Here.

Born in San Francisco in November 1962, Kirk Hammett quickly found himself obsessed with watching monster movies and reading books and comics. Transitioning through his teenage years meant taking up guitar and teaching himself how to play by ear for hours on end.

In 1979, Kirk Hammett named and founded the metal band Exodus. After recording a three-song demo in 1982, Hammett was called out to New York to audition for Metallica, and by the time Kill ‘Em All was released in July of 1983, he was officially part of the Metallica plan for world domination. Adding his style and passion into the mix helped define and shape the sound of Metallica as they grew into the band they are now, and Hammett’s solos and signature licks have inspired a legion of musicians young and old.

From Hammett’s early sonic experiences with a guitar out of a Montgomery Ward store catalog special, progressing to hitting Hendrix vibes with a ’78 Fender Stratocaster, then moving on professionally to Gibson Flying Vs and Les Pauls, and customized ESP’s. It goes without saying that Kirk Hammett is a guitar geek and has an affinity for anything with six strings including his 1985 Jackson Randy Rhoads Flying V or a frequently played Gibson 59 Les Paul Standard that once belonged to the immortal genius of both Peter Green and Gary Moore – affectionately known and celebrated worldwide as “Greeny.” Now as Metallica celebrates their 40th Anniversary in 2021, Kirk Hammett is ready to let those strings shine once again.

Dave Mustaine partners with Gibson Brands for a whole bunch of guitars

NASHVILLE, TN (February 23, 2021) For 127 years, Gibson has shaped sound across generations and genres of music, becoming one of the most relevant, played, and loved guitar brands around the world. Gibson is proud to officially announce a new partnership with Dave Mustaine, the legendary guitarist, vocalist, songwriter, and GRAMMY®-winning founder and leader of Megadeth who joins Gibson as a Brand Ambassador. The new Dave Mustaine Collection will span acoustic and electric guitars across Gibson, Epiphone, and Kramer.
Dave will join the Gibson Artist Alliance–a forum which includes legendary musicians, innovative movers and shakers, and new talent–to share in thought leadership, research & development, mentorship of the next generation of players, as well as philanthropic endeavors. In addition to the Dave Mustaine Collection, Dave will be featured in original content and special projects across Gibson, Epiphone, and Kramer.
“One of first albums I ever bought was Kiss Alive. On the back of that LP was the Gibson logo, followed by ‘Kiss uses Gibson Guitars because they want the best’. Period,” says Dave Mustaine. “Years later, I’m still that same fan, but now I’ve been playing, touring, writing, and performing around the world myself, and I can say that I could not agree more with that statement. As I was looking for a change in my guitars, I met with Cesar and got his perspective on the vision and direction Gibson is taking. I saw passion, respect for the instruments, a focus on quality and a company that is led by guitar players. I feel I am finally at home with Gibson and I am proud of what we’re building together. I can’t wait for the world to get their hands on the new Gibson, Epiphone, and Kramer Dave Mustaine Collection guitars. This is a dream come true for me, don’t #@!# wake me up.”
“It’s an honor to welcome icon, pioneer and visionary musician Dave Mustaine to the Gibson family as our brand ambassador”, said Cesar Gueikian of Gibson Brands. “Dave is one of the most influential metal icons and riff lords of all time, having paved the way for multiple generations of players to carry the flag for hard rock and heavy metal, from riff writers to shredders and everyone in between. Working with Dave is especially gratifying because he is a guitar nerd like me, who gets involved in every aspect of the development of the concepts and ideas we have been designing with him at the Gibson Lab. When I was as kid learning how to play guitar, I aspired to play Dave’s riffs and I was one of the fortunate fans who attended their Youthanasia Tour concert at Estadio Obras Sanitarias in 1994, in Buenos Aires, Argentina, where the ‘Aguante Megadeth’ chant was born over the song Symphony of Destruction. That was an epic night that I will never forget. I look forward to bringing this partnership to life and unveiling the first stages of the Dave Mustaine Collection to the world.”
Watch and share the new interview with Dave Mustaine and Cesar Gueikian of Gibson, HERE.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hfpveFuzFbU
Renowned worldwide, the thrash metal pioneer founded MEGADETH 35 years ago, virtually inventing the thrash metal genre with the band’s debut album, Killing Is My Business… And Business Is Good! MEGADETH has sold more than 38 million albums, earning many accolades along the way, including a GRAMMY® Award and 12 additional GRAMMY® nominations, and five, consecutive platinum / multi-platinum albums, including 1992’s two-million-selling Countdown to Extinction. MEGADETH has headlined many of the biggest stages in the world and sold-out arenas as part of ‘The Big Four.’ Prior to founding MEGADETH, Mustaine co-wrote many of the songs on Metallica’s Kill Em All and Ride the Lightning albums as the band’s original lead guitarist, which have certified sales totaling more than 14 million copies. Across the entirety of his recorded catalog, Mustaine has achieved a staggering sales tally of nearly 50 million albums worldwide. Listen to MEGADETH, HERE.
MEGADETH’s last studio album, Dystopia (2016), debuted at No. 3 on the Billboard 200 Albums chart. The critically acclaimed album was featured in Best Albums lists from leading music magazines, including Rolling Stone’s “20 Best Metal Albums of 2016”(No. 6); Revolver’s “Top 20 Metal Albums of 2016” (No. 2); and Loudwire’s “20 Best Albums of 2016” (No. 12) and “Best Metal Songs of 2016” (No. 2) for the title track, “Dystopia.” MEGADETH won a Silver CLIO Award for their Dystopia VR album campaign, and the album’s blistering title track earned the band a GRAMMY® Award for Best Metal Performance.
With his visionary business acumen, Mustaine holds the mantle as metal’s most enterprising mogul and has founded multiple brands in and outside of music. To name just a few, MEGADETH À Tout le Monde and Saison 13 beer (eight million+ pints sold to date across North America, UK, Europe), House of Mustaine vineyards’ award-winning wines, a range of signature guitar gear, a 2020 graphic novel anthology with Heavy Metalmagazine, the FIRST EVER band website in history (Megadeth Arizona), the Cyber Army fan club (established in 1994), five successful traveling GIGANTOUR all-star music festivals, Megadeth fan Boot Camp (sold out), and the inaugural Megacruise(sold out).
In 2010, Mustaine released his New York Times-bestselling autobiography, titled Mustaine: A Heavy Metal Memoir in the U.S, UK, Europe, Australia, and New Zealand. In September 2020, Mustaine released his second national bestseller RUST IN PEACE: The Inside Story of the Megadeth Masterpiece to coincide with the 30th anniversary of MEGADETH’s iconic thrash metal masterpiece Rust in Peace.
In 2019, Mustaine was given a cancer diagnosis while he was out on the road and he approached cancer like he has dealt with all the hard blows in his life – with all his energy and passion focused on a singular goal. After intense treatment, he succeeded and his cancer is in remission, and all aspects of his life and business continues with his same intensity and perseverance. Nothing has slowed down for Mustaine who is currently working on MEGADETH’s 16th album for 2021.
Following is a sampling of prototypes for the new Dave Mustaine Collection below:

Someone nicked $100,000 worth of Adam Jones Les Pauls

Sweetwater and Gibson Report Theft of Limited-Edition Gibson Adam Jones 1979 Les Paul Custom Silverburst Guitars

NASHVILLE, TN (November 5, 2020) A pallet of new Gibson Adam Jones 1979 Les Paul Custom Silverburst guitars has been stolen from a Sweetwater Music truck at the Flying J Travel Center in Whiteland, IN on October 30, 2020. The truck was en route to Fort Wayne, IN, the headquarters of Sweetwater Sound.

“Somehow out of a truck full of guitars, this ONE pallet was singled out and stolen at a truck stop,” says Sweetwater Chief Supply Chain and Merchandising Officer Phil Rich. “Totaling close to $95,000 in guitars, we feel this person/s knew exactly what to look for and when.”

“These guitars were the dream guitars of 13 Gibson and Adam Jones fans, who had been patiently waiting for them to be delivered,” says Cesar Gueikian of Gibson. “We have decided to publish the serial numbers of the 13 stolen guitars and are appealing to all of Gibson’s fans to keep an eye out for them and let us know if they surface. Our fans should ask any third-party sellers for a serial number before purchasing to be sure they are not being sold one of the stolen guitars.”

Anyone with information regarding the guitars should contact Detective Kenny Polley of the Whiteland Police Department at KPolley@whitelandpd.us or (317) 535-8100.

“Our loyal customers have been waiting a long time to receive these guitars and will be devastated,” says David Fuhr, SVP of The Sweetwater Experience. “We hope Gibson and Sweetwater’s tight-knit community of guitarists will be able to help us recover the stolen items and that the people responsible for the theft are caught.”

As announced last week, Gibson and Adam Jones of the band Tool launched a multi-year partnership and collaboration which premiered on Wednesday (Oct. 27) with the new Adam Jones 1979 Les Paul Custom guitar, a limited-edition guitar from Gibson Custom Shop Murphy Lab that exactly recreates Adam’s #1 guitar, his prized original Silverburst 1979 Gibson Les Paul. Upon release, all of the guitars immediately sold out worldwide.

The Adam Jones 1979 Les Paul Custom guitar comes in a limited offering of 79 replicas which have been precisely aged by the expert luthiers and craftspeople of the Gibson Custom Shop Murphy Lab–led by Tom Murphy–and are signed and numbered by Adam himself. An additional 179 Adam Jones Les Paul Custom guitars for 2020 feature exclusive silkscreen artwork on the back of the headstock, created by Joyce Su and Adam. The two also collaborated on the design for the custom hardshell guitar cases housing each instrument.

One of rock’s most talented artists, Adam Jones is renowned as the guitarist for the multiplatinum and multiple GRAMMY Award® winning band Tool, as well as his work as a visual artist, sculptor, videographer, producer, and special effects designer. For the world premiere of the new Adam Jones Les Paul Custom, Adam created and scored the animated short film, The Witness. Composed and performed by Adam, the song “The Witness” also features Adam’s Tool bandmates Danny Carey on percussion and Justin Chancellor on bass, and was mixed by Joe Barresi. Watch and share The Witness, streaming on Gibson TV, Here.

Gibson and Adam Jones announce signature Silverburst Les Paul

NASHVILLE, TN (October 27, 2020) Gibson and Adam Jones are pleased to announce the kick-off of their partnership and collaboration with the Gibson Custom Shop Adam Jones 1979 Les Paul Custom guitar.
“I’m proud to finally show the world the first release in our multi-year partnership with Adam Jones,” says Cesar Gueikian, Gibson Brands. “Adam is one of the most talented and sonically innovative guitarists; I call him modern riff lord and sonic architect. His creativity and technical ability in music, visual effects, production, videography and beyond is second to none and our collaboration is a true reflection of Adam. The Gibson Les Paul Custom Adam Jones 1979 Silverburst Aged replica version is the first-ever artist collaboration done at the newly created Gibson Custom Shop Murphy Lab. I hope that fans fall in love with the guitars, starting with this initial release.”
The Adam Jones 1979 Les Paul Custom is a limited-edition guitar offering from Gibson Custom Shop Murphy Lab that exactly recreates Adam’s #1 guitar, his prized original Silverburst 1979 Gibson Les Paul, seen everywhere during the world tour for the group’s blockbuster Fear Inoculum album, which became one of the highest selling albums of 2019. A limited offering of 79 Adam Jones 1979 Les Paul Custom replicas have been precisely aged by the expert luthiers and craftspeople of the Gibson Custom Shop Murphy Lab–led by Tom Murphy–then signed and numbered by Adam himself. An additional 179 Adam Jones Les Paul Custom replicas for 2020 feature exclusive silkscreen artwork on the back of the headstock, created by Joyce Su and Adam. The two also collaborated on the design for the custom hardshell guitar cases housing each instrument.
Each Adam Jones 1979 Les Paul Custom replicates not only the look, but the exact feel of the neck profile down to the unique electronics of Adam’s original–like a hand-wound Seymour Duncan Distortion bridge pickup, a Dimarzio volume potentiometer, and custom capacitors. Even the diamond-shaped strap buttons seen on Adam’s original guitar were painstakingly recreated, as well as the mirror he affixed to the headstock – included with each.
One of rock’s most talented artists, Adam is renowned as the guitarist for the multiplatinum and multiple GRAMMY Award® winning band Tool, as well as his work as a visual artist, sculptor, videographer, producer, and special effects designer(Jurassic Park, Terminator 2, Edward Scissorhands, Ghostbusters 2, Batman 2, A Nightmare On Elm Street). Adam was heavily involved in re-creating the new guitar, working with Gibson’s luthiers in Nashville, TN to ensure the instrument was a clone of his #1 guitar. Utilizing his extensive experience in visual art, special effects and design, Adam Jones is both the director of the majority of Tool’s music videos and creates the visual experience on stage for the band. For the world premiere of the new Gibson Custom Shop Adam Jones Les Paul Custom, a special animated short film, The Witness, was created and scored by Adam and mixed by Joe Barresi.

Jerry Cantrell featured on GibsonTV’s “ICONS” Series/Trailer

NASHVILLE (June 18, 2020) Watch the trailer for next episode of GIBSON TV’s “ICONS” as JERRY CANTRELL sits down to discuss his love of songwriting, the formation of ALICE IN CHAINS, as well as his 30 plus years in music.

GIBSON TV’s “ICONS” is the new longform interview series which features with some of the most iconic artists, producers and music business pioneers working today.

Catch the full episode coming in July. 

Pictured above, the Seattle skyline from the forthcoming GIBSON TV “ICONS” episode, featuring Jerry Cantrell. 

All GIBSON TV original shows are streamed for free on Gibson.com (HERE); subscribe to GIBSON TV on YouTube and be notified when new episodes become available (HERE).

For all things Gibson:

GIBSON.COM | TWITTER | INSTAGRAM | FACEBOOK | GIBSON TV

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EPIPHONE.COM TWITTER  |  INSTAGRAM  | FACEBOOK  YOUTUBE

 

Rebel Without A Cause: The Gibson M-III Superstrat

The early 1990s were an unusual time of rapid change for guitar design. In the 1980s, the classic shapes of the 60s and 70s had fallen by the wayside, replaced by sleek shredder’s axes. Where once guitar players demanded elegant carved maple tops and fixed bridges, the typical guitarist of the 80s wanted high-output humbuckers, Floyd Rose tremolos, 24 frets, and flash. Lots of flash. Slash helped turn things around with his low-slung Gibson Les Pauls after Appetite For Destruction hit, but for the most part, day-glo finishes and pointy curves were where it was at. 

In the early 90s, that all changed. Suddenly, by the end of 1992 shredding was out. And 80s-style hard rock was really out. And the guitars that made that music were really, really out. Players were instead seeking vintage – or at least retro-styled – guitars in keeping with the alternative aesthetic. Nobody wanted thin necks, hot pickups, whammy bars or reverse headstocks. As a result, a lot of innovative guitars never quite got their shot. Once such instrument was the Gibson M-III. 

After a decade of trial and error, guitarists and guitar companies alike were really starting to get the hang of hard rock-oriented guitar design by the early 90s. The Gibson M-III, introduced in 1991, was a sleek, double-cutaway instrument which was surprisingly un-Gibson-like, with the exception of its Les Paul-style volume and tone knobs and reverse Explorer-type headstock. The Standard and Deluxe models sported Schaller-made Floyd Rose tremolos and a H-S-H (humbucker/single coil/humbucker) pickup layout married to a five-way blade switch and a two-way toggle, making the guitar capable of both humbucker and single coil sounds. The pickups were a 496R in the neck position, a 500T in the bridge and an NSX single coil in the middle position. Flip the two-way switch one way and it focused on humbucker sounds: flip it the other for single coil voicings. A total of nine separate sounds were possible, including an enhanced neck pickup tone and a stand-by mode for muting or kill switch effects. Great care was taken to make the pickup layout seem intuitive, presumably to ease the learning curve for an admittedly un-Gibson-like Gibson. One particularly interesting touch was the ‘zebra’ pickup color scheme: the white coils of each humbucker, combined with the white single coil, provided a visual reminder that the guitar was capable of traditional 3-pickup single coil sounds as well as twin-humbucker ones.

An advertisement from 1991 touted the M-III’s slim-taper neck, “shaped to your hand, not some alien’s.” That 1-14/32-inch wide neck (which was set in, compared to the bolt-on necks one might expect on such an instrument) featured 24 jumbo frets, offset arrowhead-shaped offset inlays and a maple fretboard. The neck joined the body at the 22nd fret for superb upper-fret access, and to this day, if one digs deep enough, internet message boards are peppered with players reporting how pleasant the M-III’s neck is to play. In February 1992 Guitar World’s Chris Butler reviewed the M-III Standard and remarked that the instrument’s only drawback was that it was so addictive to play that he found himself noodling instead of focusing on the recording session at hand.

The M-III Standard and Deluxe each had a uniquely-shaped tortiseshell pickguard with an almost tigerstripe effect, which followed the crescent-like arc created by the treble and bass side cutaways. (Actually, if you squint hard enough, the pickguard almost looks like an upside-down and backwards Explorer body). The pickguard was echoed by a tortiseshell truss rod cover and toggle switch surround. The guitar was available in ebony, white and candy apple red (Standard) or a clear finish which showed off the quality of the mahogany body (Deluxe).

Other variants included some which were rear-routed (ie: no pickguard); different pickup layouts (a pair of humbuckers with no single coil); different tremolos (Steinberger); and different woods and construction methods (neck-thru models were produced, and there are unconfirmed anecdotal reports of a handful of bolt-on models out there in the wild). The innovative switching system and pickup layout were also incorporated into a few Les Paul models, while Epiphone made a version called the EM-2 Rebel (1991-1998), and offered basses inspired by the M-III body shape all the way into 1999. The M-III, meanwhile, remained in the Gibson catalog in one form or another until 1996, and today the body shape lives on in two guitars from Epiphone’s prophecy series, the EM-2 EX and EM-2 FX (the EM-1 was discontinued in 2010).

An early adopter was Sid Fletcher of the band Roxy Blue, who used the guitar in the video for the band’s single “Rob The Cradle” and appeared in a print advertisement campaign for Gibson in 1992. But for the most part, the M-III was bought and loved by regular players who required a high-performance instrument with Swiss Army Knife-like tonal flexibility.

Gibson brought the M-III back for a while in the early 2010s but in a stripped-down format without a lot of the stuff that made the original M-III cool, like the mini-toggle and the pickguard. They’re fun guitars if you ever get to try one, but it’s just not the same.

So here’s to the original M-III and its quirky weirdness!

New Gibson Neon Les Pauls Are The First Good Thing To Come Out Of 2017

If you know me, you probably know that I love both vintage and modern guitar designs pretty much equally. Some days I love nothing more than playing my 50s-style Les Paul Traditional or my ’62 Reissue Strat. Other days I’m all about my headless Kiesel Vader or my Roadflare Red Ibanez RG550. Well Gibson have gone and combined two of my loves in the one guitar: a Les Paul Axcess with Floyd Rose and – gasp! – neon finishes! It’s available in Neon Green, Neon Yellow, Neon Blue, Neon Orange and Neon Pink. Personally my pick of the bunch is the Neon Green. Look at that thing. 

The bodies are Mahogany with a 2-piece Maple top, with a Mahogany neck and Richlite fingerboard. The neck is a Slim C-Shape, and the pickups are a 496R neck humbucker and a 498T in the bridge position, with push-pull pots for coil splitting. 

Pics below, more info here.

INTERVIEW: Stone Sour’s Corey Taylor

Photo by Travis Shinn

Photo by Travis Shinn

If you look in the current issue of Mixdown Magazine you’ll find my interview with Stone Sour’s Corey Taylor about the band’s new album, Hydrograd (released today). We had a great chat about the band’s incredible new album Hydrograd. But we talked about a lot more than could be fit into that article, so I thought you’d like to see some other highlights from the interview.

I Heart Guitar: One moment in the single Fabuless really made me laugh: the ‘motherfucker’ in the chorus. I have a running joke where I insert unnecessary motherfuckers in songs that really don’t deserve it. Steely Dan or the Beach Boys or something. 

Corey Taylor: [Laughs] Thats funny because I do that all the time when I’m in my car, singing. I’m always adding an unnecessary motherfucker to what I’m singing along to, where it just needs a little more, y’know? I mean I’m sure they would have gotten to the motherfucker eventually but they were too busy with the notes, so people like you and me provide the motherfucker for them.

That song is so eclectic. How did it come together? 

That song came together from Tooch (guitarist Christian Martucci) and Roy (Magora, drums) jamming together. It was one of those songs where when we heard the demo we were like ‘Holy shit.’ It took a little arranging because it was all in different spots – it originally had a totally different feel to it – but the riffs themselves all had a great vibe. I took it and did my magic on it and worked it in with the lyrics that were going on in my head and different melodies and stuff, and it came together really quickly. It was a matter of arranging the puzzle so that the song fuckin’ figured itself out.

The first few times you listen to it you don’t quite know what could happen next. 

Exactly. And that’s the cool thing. I feel like a lot of music doesn’t have that feeling any more, and you can anticipate what the next part is. With a lot of bands you can almost write the fuckin’ next riff in your head before you’ve even heard the song all of the way through for the first time. With this song it keeps you guessing right up until the last minute.

HydrogradSo this is the first record written with Christian Martucci and Johnny Chow. 

Working with those two, honestly, was so effortless. The great thing is it all starts with us just getting along. Really getting along. We all hang out, we all love hanging out and talking shit and joking, and we’re all such dorks that it doesn’t really matter. So writing together is the same thing. We just love what we do so much that we get excited when we hear what we’re doing with the music.

How’s the spine coming along after your operation? Has it affected your range? I was thinking about how when Frank Zappa got pushed off the stage and broke his neck, and after he got rebuilt his voice got lower.

Yeah, that didn’t happen to me. It’s really only a physical thing for me. I’m slowly but surely starting to get my mobility back, and that’s even after a year. It’s been pretty crazy. But luckily I didn’t lose any of my range – actually I got some back because I quit smoking over a year ago, and I’m starting to get my range back because of that. God, if I’d know that would happen I’d have quit ten fuckin’ years ago. But I’m still in the process of rehabbing all that shit, and I’m slowing but surely getting my body back. It’s a fucking pain in the ass but I’m getting there.

I don’t think people realise how physical singing is – how much of your whole body goes into it. 

Oh yeah. You can lose your chops really easily. And not only lose your chops but you can let your talent go to fuckin’ shit, and it can take you years to get that shit back. About six years ago I started to really try to keep myself in shape as much as possible, and as long as it’s worth it you just keep trying, keep going for it.

What guitars are you using at the moment? 

On the road I have three guitars that I’m using, really. I have a 2008 Gibson Firebird that has a couple of Seymour Duncan pickups in it. It has a nice chunky edge to it and a really killer clean tone. Those guitars have a great clean tone. I also have a 1987 Gibson SG out with me that smells like the dude who owned it chain-smoked around it for about 45 years! It’s got the colour, but unfortunately it’s also got the smell, so I named it Keith. So I’ve got that out with me and I’ll probably bring that down with me to Australia when we get down there. And I’ve also got a Framus and I’m thinking about working some magic with those guys. I actually have a Stevie Salas Idolmaker model that I’m using right now and they’re fuckin’ pretty dope, dude. I wanna have them use that base and make a custom for me but give it more of a hollowbody vibe, and put a couple of humbuckers in it and see what happens. I think that could be really fuckin’ cool, because it plays amazingly. It’s got such fuckin’ chunk to it. It’s really great. So those three I’m kinda rotating through, just feeling them out every night.